Attachment or Earnings Order Types

What are Attachment Orders?

If an individual owes money then the creditor can apply to a court for an order which will allow them to take payments for the debt directly from the debtors wages.

This court order is referred to as an Attachment of Earnings Order or AEO.

As an employer, you are legally obliged to comply with any valid AEOs that you receive.

Supported Types

We support a wide range of Attachment or Earnings Orders.

The complete list is below.

If you require support for a type that isn't listed here then please do get in touch.

  • AEO Priority Order
  • Payment of unpaid TV licence or road traffic fines.
  • AEO Fine
  • Child Support
  • Child Support 2012
  • Deduction of Earnings Order
  • AEO Non Priority Order
  • For civil debts such as unpaid credit cards or money owed for work done.
  • Community Charge Pre-92
  • Payment of unpaid poll tax prior to 1992.
  • Community Charge Post 92
  • Payment of unpaid council tax after 1992.
  • Council Tax Attachment
  • Payment of unpaid council tax.
  • Magistrates Court Attachment
  • Earning Arrest
  • A Scottish order for civil debts and fines such as utility bills or unpaid fines.
  • Current Maintenance Arrest
  • A Scottish order for maintenance to a spouse or child.
  • Conjoined Arrestment Order
  • A Scottish order for the combination of more than one EA or CMA
  • Income Support Deduction
  • Issued by the Department of Work and Pensions to recover Income Support paid whilst an employee was on trade dispute.
  • Earnings Arrest (2006)
  • A Scottish order for civil debts and fines such as utility bills or unpaid fines.
  • Centralised Attachment Payment
  • Centralised method of payment for debt and maintenance.
  • Direct Earnings Attachment
  • Issued to collect overpaid benefits in England, Scotland and Wales.
  • Direct Earnings Attachment Higher
  • Issued to collect overpaid benefits in England, Scotland and Wales.
  • Direct Earnings Attachment Fixed
  • Issued to collect overpaid benefits in England, Scotland and Wales.